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Wake Forest
University Press

Wake Forest University Press

Dedicated to Irish Poetry

Lit. Crit.

Revealing Ciaran Carson’s From Elsewhere Cover

This April, we’ll be releasing the North American edition of Ciaran Carson’s From Elsewhere and we are pleased to reveal the cover design. In From Elsewhere, Carson translates poems by the French poet Jean Follain and includes his own riffs inspired by these poems. The book’s cover points to Carson’s interest in translation and reflection, with the water…

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Medbh McGuckian speaks about The High Caul Cap: “the cap is an end and a beginning”

Medbh McGuckian speaks about The High Caul Cap: “the cap is an end and a beginning”

In today’s Irish Echo, Peter McDermott interviews Medbh McGuckian on identity, inspiration, Seamus Heaney, and why she reads books upside down. McDermott’s article offers a glimpse into the poet’s thoughts behind her most recent book, The High Caul Cap, which WFUP published this past autumn. Here’s a link to the interview: McGuckian speaks candidly, revealing that the crux of the volume…

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Innocence Lost: “Boy-Soldier” by Michael Longley

Innocence Lost: “Boy-Soldier” by Michael Longley

“Child Soldier in the Ivory Coast, Africa” by Gilbert Ground Michael Longley’s recent poem, “Boy-Soldier”, was inspired by Irish author Tom McAlindon’s account of the death of WWI teenage soldier, Bobbie Kernaghan of Belfast. The images of young soldiers killed in war, of their tender necks pierced and their armor clattering to the ground link this…

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Dream Language

Dream Language

”                          …you swim from core state to fugue state in undirected milky water to a black-filled circle, which is your fully fledged city dwindled into a village” —          from “Broken Pot Used as Writing Material” Here at WFU Press we’re busy with the final…

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Today’s Lit. Crit.

Milk Could he have known that any stranger’s baby crying out loud in a street can start the flow? A stain that spreads on fustian or denim. This is kindness which in all our human time has refused to learn propriety, which still knows nothing but the depth of kinship, the depth of thirst. -Moya…

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“Legend of the Walled-up Wife” featured in “The Antioch Review”

“Legend of the Walled-up Wife” featured in “The Antioch Review”

The spring 2013 issue of The Antioch Review takes a thoughtful look at our recent volume, Legend of the Walled-up Wife, Eiléan Ní Chuilleanáin’s translations of Ileana Mălăncioiu’s poetry.  Written under the Ceaușescu regime, the book has dark, chilling imagery throughout and critic Benjamin S. Grossberg writes: “Mălăncioiu often blurs the line between life and death, creating the sense of…

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A Lil’ Bit of Lit. Crit.

A Lil’ Bit of Lit. Crit.

As promised last week, we at the Press would like to take a moment to dive a little deeper into Boston College’s recent review of Medbh McGuckian’s My Love Has Fared Inland. As previously mentioned, it was nice to see BC’s reviewer, Heather Bryant Jordan, point out the same elements of movement in My Love…

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Interns' Corner: So Many New Reviews!!

Here at the press, we’re really ecstatic about the multitude of reviews our poets have been featured in recently. As if Harry Clifton’s review of last week’s featured poet, Thomas Kinsella, wasn’t coincidental enough, this afternoon, we received our issue Boston College’s Irish Literary Supplement and found a few more surprises. Not only did the supplement include a new review of Michael…

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A Lil’ Bit of Lit. Crit.

A Lil’ Bit of Lit. Crit.

What is the place of poetry in modern society?  An unoriginal question, I know.  But, it is clear that, at best, there is a certain collective ambivalence towards it, evidenced by the shrinking sections of poetry in libraries, bookstores, and on personal bookshelves.  Poetry, sadly (or not-so-sadly for others), is often declared to be a…

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A Lil’ Bit of Lit. Crit.: “The Essential Brendan Kennelly”

A Lil’ Bit of Lit. Crit.: “The Essential Brendan Kennelly”

In their foreword to the Press’s fall publication of The Essential Brendan Kennelly, Terrence Brown and Michael Longley write that “Kennelly’s poetry is instinctively sociable, hospitable as it is the lives, voices, deeds and defining deaths of a host of characters.” Textually, this quality of Kennelly’s work leaps off the page through Kennelly’s written shifts…

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A Lil Bit of Lit Crit…

A Lil Bit of Lit Crit…

In his November 2010 review of Eiléan Ní Chuilleanáin’s The Sun-fish, William Logan of The New Criterion commented that “Ní Chuilleanáin loves this stillness the timelessness of Ireland both passing and passed—stately, measured, the poems unfold in their own time, making very little concession to the reader. They’re full of material things, things with density but…

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Travel

Travel

Lara Marlowe, author and Washington correspondent to The Irish Times, stated in an interview with the Irish Echo that you’re Irish if “you delight in language, enjoy good company and never lose touch with the sadness that runs through all things.” Although Marlowe is American, she maintains a  residence in Ireland and is a world-traveled journalist. In the interview, Marlowe…

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Praise for Michael Longley

Praise for Michael Longley

Recently, The Boston Globe named Michael Longley’s A Hundred Doors as one of the best poetry books of 2011. “This year Wake Forest University Press has delivered ‘A Hundred Doors’ by Irish poet Michael Longley, who has yet to receive the American acclaim surrounding many of his contemporaries. In this collection, readers are transported to…

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Lil’ Bit of Lit. Crit.

Lil’ Bit of Lit. Crit.

Literary critic William Logan isn’t the easiest on poets. Ever. But we agreed with something he said in his recent New Criterion review of Michael Longley’s latest book, A Hundred Doors, which WFUP published last May. Logan writes: “Longley’s father won the Military Cross in World War I (a medal equivalent to the Silver Star). The…

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A Lil’ Bit of Lit. Crit.

A Lil’ Bit of Lit. Crit.

“The Antioch Review” provided a lovely insight unto both the cover art and the poetry of Medbh McGuckian’s My Love Has Fared Inland. Describing the cover, Smith writes: “Just look at this, the reader might say, with the critics who have emphasized the painter’s practice within McGuckian’s poems: ‘A gray trembling flame left the ceilings…

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