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Wake Forest University Press

Dedicated to Irish Poetry

Poetry

Poem of the Week: “She is my love” by Trevor Joyce

This week we are celebrating Valentine’s Day and the forthcoming publication of Volume IV of The Wake Forest Series of Irish Poetry with Trevor Joyce’s “She is my love.” The first lines of each stanza echo the language of traditional love poems, only to be subverted in the lines that follow. Through his manipulation of the…

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Poem of the Week: “Glaciers” by Sinéad Morrissey

As we approach our publication date for Volume IV of The Wake Forest Series of Irish Poetry, we continue with poetry from previous volumes. This week’s poem by Sinéad Morrissey can be found in Volume I. The simple language reflects the naturalistic and somewhat sinister undertones of the poem, which highlight the connection between humanity, earth,…

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Poem of the Week: “Viola D’Amore” by Moya Cannon

This week, we continue to look back through The Wake Forest Series of Irish Poetry as we prepare to publish Volume IV. Today we’re featuring Moya Cannon from Volume II, whose subtle yet distinct voice demands a reader’s attention. Her poems are largely preoccupied with the sphere of landscapes, and how human desire—sometimes expressed through the invocation of Greek myths—is interwoven into…

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Poem of the Week: “Water” by Dennis O’Driscoll

Photo courtesy of Melissa Libutti As we approach the publication date for The Wake Forest Series of Irish Poetry, Volume IV, we’re taking a look back at some of the poets published in previous volumes from this series, which aims to introduce lesser-known Irish poets to an American audience. This week’s poet is Dennis O’Driscoll, whose work…

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Holiday Sale: 40% off

This year, we’re especially grateful for the world’s poets—their words reveal the nuances in life’s complexity and help us find meaning in uncertain times. In that spirit, we are once again running our annual holiday sale. We hope you’ll consider poetry a particularly appropriate gift this year, for others or for yourself. Over the past few weeks, we’ve received many…

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Poem of the Week: “Endymion” by Thomas Kinsella

As we get ready to celebrate Halloween, let’s take a moment to think about where the most frightful holiday of the year comes from—Samhain (pronounced SOW-in). Samhain is a traditional Celtic celebration to remind people that the year is about to get darker, and that harvest season is over: Winter is here! It’s also a…

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“Mostly dark, with a chink of light”: Alan Gillis reflects on Scapegoat and Other Poems

Alan Gillis’s Scapegoat and Other Poems launched on October 1st. To celebrate, WFU Press interns Fahad Rahmat and Rachel Stewart asked Gillis about his influences, religion’s redemptive impulse, how he sees current society and pop culture, and plenty more. WFU Press: Throughout Scapegoat, the reader encounters words like “fugging” and “pizz-popping, jingle-jangle”—sounds which you’ve incorporated into the…

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Poem of the Week: “Coda: Payne’s Grey” by Paula Meehan

Happy spring and happy National Poetry Month! As we begin a month known for its showers, Paula Meehan’s poem “Coda: Payne’s Grey” came to mind. The final poem in her collection, Painting Rain, it celebrates what poetry can capture and preserve, even as everything changes, like trying to capture an image of falling rain. Coda: Payne’s Grey I am trying to…

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Poem of the Week to Celebrate Samhain

Poem of the Week to Celebrate Samhain

It’s the last week of October, which means it’s almost Halloween, the spookiest time of year. Did you know that Halloween originates from the Celtic festival called Samhain? We enjoy getting into the Samhain spirit by reading some of our poets’ eeriest pieces. Here’s a particularly creepy poem of the week from Louis MacNeice. Plant…

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Poem of the Week: “Clotho” by Caitríona O’Reilly

Poem of the Week: “Clotho” by Caitríona O’Reilly

It’s publication week for Caitríona O’Reilly’s new volume Geis (available now in print, iBook, and Kindle editions). This week’s featured poem is a sneak peek into this wonderful book. For more on O’Reilly’s inspiration, writing process, and more, check out our Q&A with the poet. Happy reading, poetry lovers! Clotho after Camille Claudel And in the end it was…

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Poem of the Week: Happy Birthday, Ciaran Carson!

Poem of the Week: Happy Birthday, Ciaran Carson!

Today is Ciaran Carson’s birthday, and in celebration of this accomplished poet and traditional musician from Belfast, we are sharing one of his earlier poems, “The Albatross,” from his book First Language as our featured poem this week. This poem is written after the poem “L’Albatros” by the French poet Charles Baudelaire. In it, the speaker compares the…

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Ciaran Carson on tour in the U.S. next month

Ciaran Carson on tour in the U.S. next month

We are pleased to announce that Ciaran Carson will be on tour in the U.S. this November. If you’ve never had the opportunity to see him read his work, you’re in for a treat. His lively readings combine poetry with traditional Irish music, making for a delightful and festive evening. A quick search on YouTube…

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New Irish Literature Festival in Phoenix

New Irish Literature Festival in Phoenix

This weekend Irish literature will be celebrated in a new way here in America. The non-profit organization Phoenix Sister Cities will be hosting its own Ennis Committee Book Festival this Sunday, September 27 in Phoenix, Arizona. This year is the first for this festival, but it is meant to be a counterpart to an established literary event in…

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Introducing Geis by Caitríona O’Reilly

Introducing Geis by Caitríona O’Reilly

In her third collection of poetry, Caitríona O’Reilly presents a cabinet of curiosities, landscapes ranging from Iceland to Iowa, and a cast of characters including Jackson Pollock, Camille Claudel, and Clint Eastwood. Moving between the scientific and the supernatural, O’Reilly is consistently sharp with language that is Latinate, tactile, and intuitive, what Michael Longley has…

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We’re back (and with a Poem of the Week)

We’re back (and with a Poem of the Week)

This summer, we’ve been busy with a few exciting projects that we’ll be sharing with you in due time. To celebrate being back and the near end of a productive summer, we’re sharing Frank Ormsby’s poetic treatment of American craft beer. Cheers! At the Lazy Boy Saloon and Ale Bar (White Plains, NY) The beers of…

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Introducing: The Boys of Bluehill

Introducing: The Boys of Bluehill

Wake Forest University Press is proud to announce the arrival of Eiléan Ní Chuilleanáin’s Boys of Bluehill. In her newest collection, Ní Chuilleanáin addresses the themes of music, religion, art, and language to create a beautiful union between revelatory imagery and an acute poetic sensibility. Of her work, Seamus Heaney remarked: “There is something second-sighted about Eiléan Ní Chulleanáin’s work….

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Poem of the Week: October Thoughts & Throwback

Poem of the Week: October Thoughts & Throwback

WFU Press’s newest book is here! Ciaran Carson’s From Elsewhere is a beautiful work featuring translations of the French poet Jean Follain juxtaposed alongside Carson’s original work. In his “Apropros,” Carson offers, “…[T]he word fetch…was in my mind throughout the writing of From Elsewhere.” He goes on to say, “A fetch is the act of fetching, bringing from a distance,…

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It’s No Joke! April 1st Kicks Off National Poetry Month

April marks the beginning of National Poetry Month! While poetry can and should be celebrated all year round, this is the “official” month to celebrate poetry in all of its various forms. Literary geeks around the country will soon participate in another annual National Poetry Month, which was first founded in 1996 by the Academy of American…

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A festive celebration for WFU Press

In the U.S., there’s no better day to celebrate Irish heritage and our connections with Ireland than St. Patrick’s Day. Green rivers, cheesy shamrock hats, and buckets o’ Guinness aside, we’re always happy to advocate for the rich Irish culture that exists in our country. This year, we’ve been celebrating with the publication of a very special and unique book…

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Picking a Poem for Ireland

Raidió Teilifís Éireann (RTÉ), Ireland’s National Public Service Broadcaster, is currently promoting a campaign called A Poem for Ireland. This contest began in September when RTÉ asked followers to submit stand-out poems from the past century that encapsulated the Irish experience. With their nominations, followers submitted explanations for why their favorite should earn the recognition. Over…

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Poem of the Week:”Pas de Deux”

A poem for Valentine’s Day– Pas de Deux It all began in Take Two, what with us looking at clothes. You’d brushed against me as I stepped aside from the mirror to let you size yourself up against a blue pencil skirt, pinching its waistband to your waist with your arms akimbo. I caught you…

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Poem of the Week: “Swallows and Willows”

In Dharmakaya, Paula Meehan creates a beautiful poem, highlighting the parallels between her own Irish voice, and the voice of one of America’s most commemorated female poets–Sylvia Plath. February 11th marks the 52nd anniversary of Plath’s death, and we love the fact that this poem creates a space where the haunting, feminine poetics of two of our favorite writers…

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Poem of the Week: “January Drought”

Poem of the Week: “January Drought”

As storm clouds roll into Winston-Salem, Conor O’Callaghan writes of a somewhat drier world—yet the haunting sentimentality of his poetic voice still manages to soak us to the bone. January Drought It needn’t be tinder, this juncture of the year, a cigarette flicked from car to brush. The woods’ parchment is given to cracking asunder the…

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Here's how you feel about e-books

Happy New Year, poetry readers! We had a busy holiday season, and we’re looking forward to what 2015 may bring. Right away, we’re preparing to attend the Digital Book World conference in New York next week to learn more about how we can continue to adapt to an increasingly digital publishing climate. With that priority in mind, we conducted…

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Poem of the Week: “Christmas Tree”

Poem of the Week: “Christmas Tree”

Christmas Tree for Jacob You are my second grandson, Christmas-born. I put on specs to read your face. Whispering Sweet nothings to your glistening eyelids, Am I outspoken compared with you? You sleep While I carry you to our elderly beech. Your forefinger twitches inside its mitten. Do you feel at home in my aching…

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Poem of the Week: “Closed Bells” by Medbh McGuckian

Poem of the Week: “Closed Bells” by Medbh McGuckian

As we transition into winter, Medbh McGuckian’s frosty poem Closed Bells reminds us of the fast-dropping temperatures. Her fleshed out, frostbitten images offer the characteristic “wordlessness” for which McGuckian is best known and create a dream world suspended in the mid-season chill. Closed Bells Frost hollows small areas of leaf in gardenless margins. Wounded by the thought of nests expanding, they inspire devotion…

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It’s publication day for The Stairwell

It’s publication day for The Stairwell

We are delighted to announce that The Stairwell by Michael Longley is now available on our website! For the Poem of the Week, we offer here the title poem.   The Stairwell  For Lucy McDiarmid I have been thinking about the music for my funeral— Liszt’s transcription of that Schumann song, for instance, ‘Dedication’ — inwardness meets the…

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A final song for Samhain

A final song for Samhain

Halloween is finally here! While children dress in costume and parents don their houses with spooky decorations, we are paying tribute to John Montague and his eerie poem about the Celtic festival that celebrates the arrival of the “darker half” of the year. The auditory and sensory imagery Montague engages sends shivers down our spine, as we welcome…

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What does Ireland’s official Professor of Poetry do?

What does Ireland’s official Professor of Poetry do?

In September of last year, WFU Press’s very own poet, Paula Meehan, was appointed to serve as Ireland’s newest Professor of Poetry. This prestigious position, which is Ireland’s equivalent to the U.S. Poet Laureate, was founded by an independent Board of Trustees in response to Seamus Heaney’s 1995 win of the Nobel Prize for Literature. Of the six individuals (including…

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Happy birthday to Ciaran Carson

Happy birthday to Ciaran Carson

Author of poetry and prose, translator, professor, and accomplished musician, Ciaran Carson is a man of so many talents that we never need much of an excuse to celebrate him. Many happy returns to you, from all at Wake Forest Press! Year After Year playing the tune over you’ve been cutting out the frills getting to…

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Poem of the Week:”The Second Voyage” by Eiléan Ní Chuilleanáin

Poem of the Week:”The Second Voyage” by Eiléan Ní Chuilleanáin

“Seascape” by John Fraser National Maritime Museum, Greenwich, London       It’s easy to compare Odysseus’ voyage to the voyage students undertake in college; whether a senior, junior, sophomore or freshman, those spiteful waves will rock you all year long. We mimic Odysseus as we fight against tests, illness, papers and uncomfortable experiences, and all…

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Poem of the Week: “Airports” by Leontia Flynn

Poem of the Week: “Airports” by Leontia Flynn

It’s Homecoming week at Wake Forest, so we have selected a poem for today which reflects on the liminality of travel. We wish a safe journey to all alumni making their way back toward their alma maters, be it via skyways or highways. Airports Airports are their own peculiar weather. Their lucid hallways ring like swimming pools. From each sealed lounge, a…

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Poem of the Week “Begin” by Brendan Kennelly

Poem of the Week “Begin” by Brendan Kennelly

“…bridges linking the past and future / old friends passing through with us still.” With the beginning of the school year, new interns, and an exciting new season in the publishing industry, we’re eager to see what’s ahead.  Therefore, here’s Brendan Kennelly’s poem “Begin” for your enjoyment this week. “Begin” Begin again to the summoning…

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The Stairwell cover release

The Stairwell cover release

We are delighted to share a teaser image of the cover from our upcoming release, Michael Longley’s tenth collection, The Stairwell. The cover’s aesthetic evokes a Greek vase, featuring an earthy color scheme, scroll work and, most prominently, an illustration by the poet’s daughter, Sarah Longley.  The illustration is a copy of a similar image from…

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When bad things happen to good books

When bad things happen to good books

To us, every box of newly-printed books that we receive at the Press is like a special gift opened under the Christmas tree. But from time to time, a box comes to us with minor or even major damage, and what are we to do? Why do bad things happen to good books? Unfortunately, we received a…

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Poem of the Week: “Pier” by Vona Groarke

Poem of the Week: “Pier” by Vona Groarke

Only a few weeks remain before students return to campus, and our hottest days seem to be behind us. As we desperately hang on to summer, we offer Vona Groarke’s poem, “Pier,” as a celebration of the freedom and elan that summertime allows. Pier Speak to our muscles of a need for joy.      …

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The “perfect acoustic” of The Stairwell

The “perfect acoustic” of The Stairwell

Few moments are more exciting at the Press than when we are getting started on a new book. This fall, we’ll publish Michael Longley’s tenth collection, The Stairwell, and preparations are well underway. We’ve done a first read, gathered the cover image and copy, and sent files off to the designer. The title of the book comes from the…

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Poem of the Week: Away

Poem of the Week: Away

Away We have our own smallholding: persimmon tree, crawl space, stoop, red earth basement, ceiling fans, a job. Hours I’m not sure where I am, flitting through every amber between Gales and Drumcliffe Road. I paint woodwork the exact azure of a wave’s flipside out the back of Spiddal pier and any given morning pins…

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Poem of the Week: Let it Go

Poem of the Week: Let it Go

This time of year is usually devoted to graduation ceremonies, a celebration of taking the next step, whatever that may be.  Here’s to the next step. Congratulations to all of the graduates for the year of 2014. Let it Go Let it go Out of reach, out of sight, Out of the door and the window,…

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The End of the Line

The End of the Line

The temperature is high, the pollen is present, and graduation is just around the corner. However, with the arrival of springtime blossoms comes the departure of most of our staff. Interns Nicole, Maura, Amanda, Julie and Mike are all graduating, and Candide is retiring from Assistant Director. And while I feel inclined to use the…

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Poem of the Day: “Down” by Brendan Kennelly

Poem of the Day: “Down” by Brendan Kennelly

Today marks the end of National Poetry Month, and therefore the end of our daily poems. We hope you enjoyed the daily dose of poetry. And remember, even though National Poetry Month has ended, every day is a great time to support your favorite poets. Enjoy. “Down” by Brendan Kennelly, from The Essential Brendan Kennelly…

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Poem of the Day for National Poetry Month:

Poem of the Day for National Poetry Month:

“Pitch & Putt” by Conor O’Callaghan Its is the realm of men and boys joined in boredom, the way of life that sees one day on a par with the next and school breaks dragged out too long. Theirs is the hour killed slowly, the turn for home in diminishing threes and twos, the provisional…

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Happy Poetry Month!

Happy Poetry Month!

  The Narrator during the break in chapter, gets up to stretch beneath a skylight and hears seagulls, small girls running. So many pages since he listened last that he can’t recall how it came to this or which wall the door was on or even now what time of year it is Are his…

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Paula Meehan touring United States

Paula Meehan touring United States

Wake Forest University Press poet and  current Ireland Professor of Poetry, Paula Meehan, has been charming audiences in the United States on her current reading tour. Earlier in March, Meehan appeared at HoCoPoLitSo’s Thirty-Sixth Annual Evening of Irish Music and Poetry. And on Thursday, April 3, Meehan will be reading at Canisius College in Buffalo, New York. The reading…

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Hold On! The Holding Centre is here!

Hold On! The Holding Centre is here!

Harry Clifton’s newest volume, The Holding Centre: Selected Poems 1974-2004, has arrived!     This book presents a thirty-year poetic trajectory for Clifton, a writer who has lived and worked between the secular and the religious, Eros and history, Ireland and elsewhere. Get your copy now! … You are not the first, you will not…

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Snow, Joyce and Voicemails: A Closer Look at Conor O’Callaghan’s “Three Six Five Zero”

Snow, Joyce and Voicemails: A Closer Look at Conor O’Callaghan’s “Three Six Five Zero”

Today’s snow-blanketed Wake Forest University campus. How does Conor O’Callaghan seamlessly connect a snowy North Carolinian landscape, James Joyce and voicemails? Ripe with isolation, introspection, recovery and renewal, O’Callaghan’s latest collection, The Sun King, whispers secrets and sings the emergence of light born of the soul’s darkest moments. Technology flashes in and out of The Sun King, yet O’Callaghan’s…

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Medbh McGuckian speaks about The High Caul Cap: “the cap is an end and a beginning”

Medbh McGuckian speaks about The High Caul Cap: “the cap is an end and a beginning”

In today’s Irish Echo, Peter McDermott interviews Medbh McGuckian on identity, inspiration, Seamus Heaney, and why she reads books upside down. McDermott’s article offers a glimpse into the poet’s thoughts behind her most recent book, The High Caul Cap, which WFUP published this past autumn. Here’s a link to the interview: McGuckian speaks candidly, revealing that the crux of the volume…

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Vona Groarke in The New Yorker

Vona Groarke in The New Yorker

The November 11 issue of The New Yorker includes Vona Groarke’s poem “The Landscapes of Vilhelm Hammershøi” on page 61. Vilhelm Hammershøi (1864-1916) was a Danish painter best known for his low-key, soft portraits and interiors. Enigmatic and secretive, his paintings were described as “highly traditional, but also distinctively modern” in the 2008 London Royal…

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Poem of the Week: Ciaran Carson’s “Demotic Nocturne”

Poem of the Week: Ciaran Carson’s “Demotic Nocturne”

The Destruction Of Sodom And Gomorrah, a painting by John Martin (1789-1854) In the spirit of Halloween we offer Ciaran Carson’s “Demotic Nocturne”, a tantalizing and chilling nighttime adventure that takes the reader on a technicolor journey that “disperses all the boundaries of hearth and home”. “Demotic Nocturne” appears in Carson’s collection In the Light Of, translated from Rimbaud’s Illuminations.   Demotic Nocturne (Nocturne vulgaire) A…

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Happy Belated Birthday Conor O’Callaghan

Happy Belated Birthday Conor O’Callaghan

“I toast my new age. I drink its tongue-roll, its wheel-whirr, on the road to Montecarlo. Quarantaquattro, quarantaquattro, quarantaquattro …” Conor O’Callaghan turned 45 on September 20th. All of us here at Wake Forest University Press toast Conor as he embarks on quarantecinque. The quote above is from The Pearl Works, a collection of 52…

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"Belfast Confetti," Writers Workshops, and Modern Security

“The subversive half-brick, conveniently hand-sized, is an essential ingredient of the ammunition known as ‘Belfast confetti’, and has been tried and trusted by a generation of rioters.”–Ciaran Carson, “Brick” What happens when the “real world” gets in the way of creativity? Glenn Patterson happened to be leading a workshop for the Fermanaugh Writers in Enniskellen–while…

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Louis MacNeice Poetry Evening

Louis MacNeice Poetry Evening

On May 17th, in conjunction with Ireland’s National Poetry Day celebrations, contemporary poets gathered to mark the 50th anniversary of Louis MacNeice’s death. Sinéad Morrissey, Ciaran Carson, Lucy Caldwell, and others joined together for readings at Ulster Hall in Belfast. MacNeice also has an international appeal, as demonstrated by the participation of Bermudian poet Paul…

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Wake: Up to Poetry Reading and Celebration

youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lDVeLeP-rlI If you weren’t able to make it to our Wake: Up to Poetry reading and celebration last month, you’re in luck. Thanks to The Wake Forest Interdisciplinary Performance and Liberal Arts Center (iPLACe) and the Wake Forest Documentary Film Program, we now have this lovely video of highlights from the event. We hope…

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Generation: Blogger Boomers

Generation: Blogger Boomers

Here at WFUP we are actively working to expand our use of social media and blogging as a means to connect, share our thoughts, and listen to others. A recent study by NM Incite tracked over 181 million blogs worldwide in 2011, a drastic increase from the recorded 36 million blogs in 2006. Blogs have…

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Defeated

A lack of food makes me cranky. I suffer from an extreme lack of energy and am easily defeated by any task assigned to me. Food makes it all better though. It is physical happiness and energy. We love food here at the Press. One of the easiest, yet hardest, questions asked of us interns…

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The Process of Creation

While tidying up around The Press I noticed a pair of eyes outlined in hot-orange staring at me from behind back issues of Poetry Magazine. They belong to poet Alicia Jo Rabins, her poem titled How to Graduate displayed on the back of The American Poetry Review March/April 2011 issue: God wrote me a letter…

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Poetry Month

Poetry Month

When Googling recent poetry news, I came across an article titled “The bursting buds of poetry,” published yesterday by the Gloucester Times.  This turned out to be an opinion article by Ruthanne “Rufus” Collinson about National Poetry Month. Collinson always wondered why April was chosen as National Poetry Month, as did I.  I guess I always…

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National Poetry Month

Just in case you haven’t heard, it is National Poetry Month! Needless to say we are all pretty excited here at the Wake Forest Press. I mean why wouldn’t we support a whole month dedicated to the celebration of poetry! We show our support by being a benefactor of the National Poetry Month. Visit our…

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Spring is finally here!

Spring is finally here!

After some strangely uncharacteristic cold weather, Winston-Salem is finally showing the signs of spring. As spring is my favorite time of the year, I am overjoyed that the possibility of cold and snow is long gone. Plus, any student will agree, that spring is by far the most beautiful and busiest time to be at Wake Forest….

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Another Sign of Spring

Another Sign of Spring

Today is April first. This means it is the first day of National Poetry Month, and April Fool’s Day.  It also means that today is Opening Day for the Boston Red Sox.  How do the Red Sox relate to Irish poetry? Well for one thing, there are currently two Red Sox fans in the Irish…

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A healthy dose of poetry

As the spring semester is flying by, we have two days left in March and then it will be…National Poetry Month! National Poetry Month was started in 1996 by the Academy of American Poets and is held every April. It is a time when anyone from poetry publishers to libraries and schools come together to…

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Slogging through the blogs

Slogging through the blogs

This week I’ve been doing some research on new places for poetry reviews. With the quick fade of book review sections (and newspapers on the whole), we want to know, where do people look for book reviews now? My findings so far have been rather interesting. Online journals and literary magazines are popular and seem…

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Rain, Rain, Go Away

Rain, Rain, Go Away

Today, Wake Forest is not the happiest of places. The weather is cold and rainy, without even a glimpse of sunshine, and with spring break about a week away, professors are trying to fight the apathy that students experience when a break is around the corner. This means one thing: midterms. It’s times like these…

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the (daunting) task of navigating tribble

the (daunting) task of navigating tribble

welcome to our humble abode! it seems like winston-salem gets a ‘hot’ spell every year during one isolated week in february (when it’s actually just 70 degrees). and we’re in the midst of it right now. everyone’s pushing the seasons with shorts, flip-flops, and entirely unwarranted tank tops. but we interns remain dedicated to our…

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funday monday

happy monday! candide is out of the office all week, so we interns are manning the fort. it’s valentine’s day, so we’re having some good intern corner bonding. busy with putting the spring newsletter together (what’s new).  taylor assumes the role of head honcho by taking over candide’s spot our favorite ‘nun’-chucks mac (. ….

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E-Poetry Research

E-Poetry Research

My first task as a Wake Forest University Press intern was to venture into the realm of electronic books and determine what kind of effect this giant new trend would have on our tiny traditional press. I did a little research, checking out online bookstores to see which offered e-books, who published those e-books they…

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