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Wake Forest
University Press

Wake Forest University Press

Dedicated to Irish Poetry

The Weather in Japan

$9.95$18.95

The poems in this volume vary widely in length, subject, and setting (from Mayo, to Tuscany, to Japan). With a Zen-like grace, even the briefest poems hurdle logical gaps and sidestep reason to get to truths. The poet’s acute vision is directed outward, and we know him only through the light he casts on the world’s things as he holds them in loving, elegiac frames.

Winner of the Irish Times Irish Literature Prize for Poetry, 2001
Winner of the T. S. Eliot Poetry Prize, 2001
Winner of the Hawthornden Prize, 2000


Reviews

“Michael Longley’s The Weather in Japan is the best book I have read this year and, although I have admired him for some time, I did not expect him to surpass himself. . . . Brilliant, and taking me back to earlier brilliance, [it] shocked me into understanding that the poet I had admired had quietly become—along with Seamus Heaney, say, and Geoffrey Hill—a contemporary who should endure over the life of our language.”
– Donald Hall, Los Angeles Times Sunday Book Review

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Description

The poems in this volume vary widely in length, subject, and setting (from Mayo, to Tuscany, to Japan). With a Zen-like grace, even the briefest poems hurdle logical gaps and sidestep reason to get to truths. The poet’s acute vision is directed outward, and we know him only through the light he casts on the world’s things as he holds them in loving, elegiac frames.

Winner of the Irish Times Irish Literature Prize for Poetry, 2001
Winner of the T. S. Eliot Poetry Prize, 2001
Winner of the Hawthornden Prize, 2000


Reviews

“Michael Longley’s The Weather in Japan is the best book I have read this year and, although I have admired him for some time, I did not expect him to surpass himself. . . . Brilliant, and taking me back to earlier brilliance, [it] shocked me into understanding that the poet I had admired had quietly become—along with Seamus Heaney, say, and Geoffrey Hill—a contemporary who should endure over the life of our language.”
– Donald Hall, Los Angeles Times Sunday Book Review

Additional information

Publication date:

2000

Pages:

80

Binding:

,