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Wake Forest
University Press

Wake Forest University Press

Dedicated to Irish Poetry

Tagged: “interns”

“Looser, Freer, and a Bit Wilder”: An Interview with Conor O’Callaghan

Conor O’Callaghan’s newest book of poetry Live Streaming has just been published in North America, and for months we’ve been anxiously awaiting this exciting release. O’Callaghan has been busy giving readings for the book, most recently here in the US, where he went coast to coast visiting five states in five days before returning home to England. WFU Press intern Maddie Baxter caught him via Skype at the tail-end of this trip to ask him a few questions about the book, his process, and the personal nature of this extraordinary new collection.

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Meet our new interns

Each year, we are pleased to have the assistance of student interns. This year’s crop has been diligently at work for almost a month, and already they’ve helped with proofing, e-book formatting, social media marketing, audience research, and good ol’ mass mailing. Together, they comprise our merry band o’ interns, and we’re so grateful for their help. Here’s a little bit more about each of them.

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Radio Signals: An interview with Leontia Flynn

Leontia Flynn’s The Radio is out this month, so WFU Press interns gathered to ask the poet more about her newest collection. Written in three sections, The Radio explores the boundaries of home and family life from Flynn’s experience caring for her infant child, to coping with her father’s death, to remembering the influence of…

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An Interview with Frank Ormsby on The Darkness of Snow

WFU Press interns gathered to ask the poet Frank Ormsby more about his collection, The Darkness of Snow. Written in five parts, the poems explore vast territory from Ormsby’s childhood in Fermanagh, to life with Parkinson’s, to the difficulty of bearing witness in the face of atrocity. Here, the poet discusses poetic friendships, recurring themes in his poetry, and the anti-muse.

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The End of the Line

The End of the Line

The temperature is high, the pollen is present, and graduation is just around the corner. However, with the arrival of springtime blossoms comes the departure of most of our staff. Interns Nicole, Maura, Amanda, Julie and Mike are all graduating, and Candide is retiring from Assistant Director. And while I feel inclined to use the…

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“Bigger isn’t always better: Confessions from Wake Forest University Press interns on working at a small university press”

Wake Forest University Press is the premier publisher of Irish poetry in North America. Despite the lofty designation, it is among the smallest university presses in America. WFUP publishes an average of 4-6 titles each year, all from native Irish poets. It employs two full-time staff members, in addition to a half dozen or so…

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Dream Language

Dream Language

”                          …you swim from core state to fugue state in undirected milky water to a black-filled circle, which is your fully fledged city dwindled into a village” —          from “Broken Pot Used as Writing Material” Here at WFU Press we’re busy with the final…

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Wake Up to Poetry Celebration: A WFU Press’ Intern’s Reflection

Wake Up to Poetry Celebration: A WFU Press’ Intern’s Reflection

The intermingling of poetry and Irish music created an atmosphere of  captivation, reflection, and joy.  This past Saturday night marked Wake Forest University Press’ first Wake Up to Poetry Celebration. In honor of National Poetry Month, WFUP collected student submissions, receiving more than 50 poems. The submissions were then evaluated by award-winning poets, Adrian Rice,…

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Interns’ Corner: So Many New Reviews!!

Here at the press, we’re really ecstatic about the multitude of reviews our poets have been featured in recently. As if Harry Clifton’s review of last week’s featured poet, Thomas Kinsella, wasn’t coincidental enough, this afternoon, we received our issue Boston College’s Irish Literary Supplement and found a few more surprises. Not only did the supplement include a new review of…

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Interview with an Intern!

This past semester, our new intern Kelly Neubeiser had the opportunity to intern with Simon & Schuster in London. Today, Kelly sat down with us to discuss some of her experiences at S&S, and we realized that while these two publishers could not be any more dissimilar, there are some elements that this publishing powerhouse…

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Conor O’Callaghan

Conor O’Callaghan

Poet Conor O’Callaghan may best be known to fans of Wake Forest Press for his books of poetry such as Fiction and Seatown and Earlier Poems. He will also be editing our Wake Forest Series of Irish Poetry, Volume III, which will be released next year. However, did you know that he also wrote a memoir about the Roy…

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A Lil Bit of Lit Crit…

A Lil Bit of Lit Crit…

In his November 2010 review of Eiléan Ní Chuilleanáin’s The Sun-fish, William Logan of The New Criterion commented that “Ní Chuilleanáin loves this stillness the timelessness of Ireland both passing and passed—stately, measured, the poems unfold in their own time, making very little concession to the reader. They’re full of material things, things with density but…

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Arts and Culture: O’Reilly Broadside

Arts and Culture: O’Reilly Broadside

It’s easy to quickly glance at the image associated with Caitríona O’ Reilly’s poem “Octopus” and see the connection; the image is a direct representation of the title. It all seems pretty standard. However, as I delve deeper into the poem, I find that the illustrated octopus is not only strikingly apt, but is responsible…

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What Does This Mean for Writing?

What Does This Mean for Writing?

This week at the Press, we’ve all been reading Alexandra Alter’s recent article in The Wall Street Journal on Penguin’s upcoming publication, Chopsticks, which is an enhanced e-book that combines literature with digital photo albums, video clips, and audio clips. Towards the end of the article, Alter shares an interesting quote from the book’s author, Jessica Anthony, on “the future of narrative”…

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The Art of a Cover

The Art of a Cover

It’s traditional for the portrait of authors to be put on covers of compilation volumes of their work. Brendan Kennelly, despite his “notes of disgust, fierce satire, sardonic bitterness” looks fairly happy on the cover of his new selected as a man who has grown into his career as a poet and grown into his…

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A Lil’ Bit of Lit. Crit.

A Lil’ Bit of Lit. Crit.

The Antioch Review provided a lovely insight into both the cover art and the poetry of Medbh McGuckian’s My Love Has Fared Inland. Describing the cover, Smith writes: “Just look at this, the reader might say, with the critics who have emphasized the painter’s practice within McGuckian’s poems: ‘A gray trembling flame left the ceilings…

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Poetry & Music

Ireland has given us many pleasures, poetry and music among them. The only thing better than Irish music or poetry is an Irish poem sung in a song. Irish Folk singer Christy Moore has done just that with the title track off his latest album, “Folk Tale,” written by Irish poet Paula Meehan. Moore tells…

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Did You Know…

Did You Know…

We’re back! After weeks of working on redesigning our blog we have finally finished and are excited to post again. Today is the first in what will become a series of posts on little known facts about our poets. We will start with one of the poets who just joined us on our Women’s Anthology…

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News Updates

Hello everyone! Some updates on the wonderful world of Irish poetry in North America: We have received Brendan Kennelly’s newest book, The Essential Brendan Kennelly, today! Very exciting news. The Women’s Anthology tour is well underway. The ladies have since been in Chicago, Pittsburgh, and New York, with great crowds at each place. Thank you everyone…

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Little Change, Big Change

Proofing for Harry Clifton we slowly realized that somewhere between the original hard copy and the more recent copy he sent us, a few changes had been made. Some of these changes are minimal: a new comma, or a period replaced by an ellipse. But other changes are significant enough to alter the meaning of…

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A healthy dose of poetry

As the spring semester is flying by, we have two days left in March and then it will be…National Poetry Month! National Poetry Month was started in 1996 by the Academy of American Poets and is held every April. It is a time when anyone from poetry publishers to libraries and schools come together to…

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