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Eiléan Ní Chuilleanáin

Eiléan Ní Chuilleanáin

…leased in April 2020. *Author photo by Niall Hartnett Praise for Eiléan Ní Chuilleanáin “[Ní Chuilleanáin’s work] thrives on the creepings, rustlings and imperceptible burgeonings of life which are the opposite of sureness and solidity.” – Clair Wills, TLS “Eiléan Ní Chuilleanáin employs a poetic point of view that is displaced, unspecified, and often enigmatic; her poetry resonates with ancient rites and presences from a spiritual otherworld. She…

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Collected Poems | Eiléan Ní Chuilleanáin

Collected Poems | Eiléan Ní Chuilleanáin

…vailable on Amazon.com EPUB version available on Nook Praise for Eiléan Ní Chuilleanáin “As the poems in this great Collected now show us, as well as being a poet of history, Eiléan Ní Chuilleanáin is also a poet for the present, anxious moment. The knowledge her work contains is urgent human knowledge, exquisite in its feeling and accomplished in its polish. This Collected is her latest monumental act of self-scrutiny and illumination. It is a jo…

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Selected Poems | Eiléan Ní Chuilleanáin

Selected Poems | Eiléan Ní Chuilleanáin

…y and the domestic as new metaphors for human experiences and emotions. Ní Chuilleanáin allows those who have been silenced in history to surface in art as surreal but living presences. Reviews “There is something second sighted, as it were, about Eiléan Ní Chuilleanáin’s work by which I don’t mean that she has any prophetic afflatus, more that her poems see things anew, in a rinsed and dreamstruck light. They are at once as plain as an anecdote t…

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A Lil Bit of Lit Crit: “The Copious Dark” by Eiléan Ní Chuilleanáin

A Lil Bit of Lit Crit: “The Copious Dark” by Eiléan Ní Chuilleanáin

…, and the Platonic grandmother.” Recently, I found that this quality of Ní Chuilleanáin’s work, the idea of a poem unfolding in its own time, is most noticeable in her poem “The Copious Dark” from The Sun-fish, which was reprinted in The Wake Forest Book of Irish Women’s Poetry this past fall. Throughout the poem, Ní Chuilleanáin beautifully traces through the journey of her subject by marking changes in time and space with variances in light imag…

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Guinn Batten on Eiléan Ní Chuilleanáin’s new COLLECTED POEMS

…ries—become real, and gratifying, in appearing in this Collected Poems. Ní Chuilleanáin negotiates with control and aplomb the border between (to use a word she favors) a copious world, with its manifold conflicts and possibilities, and (to use another) the praeteritio, “passing over in silence,” the rhetorical device that hides and preserves but also insists. We celebrate with these poems the miracle of a reality, shattering but also sheltering,…

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Video Highlights from Eiléan Ní Chuilleanáin’s Reading at Wake Forest

…ninety-five Spenserian stanzas, and across Europe and Turkey, so at last he could finish with the pilgrim Harold and meet himself as a child, said ###that he laid his hand on the mane of the dark blue sea. —Eiléan Ní Chuilleanáin, from The Boys of Bluehill (2015) In this video, Ní Chuilleanáin reads “Finding Proteus” from her newest volume, as well as two new unpublished poems: Watch more highlights on our YouTube channel….

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“A Deep Ocean One Can Plunge Into”: An Interview with Eiléan Ní Chuilleanáin

…sh) lend to the reading experience? Are they two poems, or four? Eiléan Ní Chuilleanáin: I had no intention originally of translating them; that was a last-minute suggestion by the Irish publisher. They have done a number of bilingual books recently and the bilingual edition seems to have become normal; I have doubts about it, but in a bilingual country there is an argument to be made. They are definitely two poems, not four, as the translations a…

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Poem of the Week: The Horses of Meaning by Eiléan Ní Chuilleanáin

…age—is “the next bit of the story.” This month marks the publication of Ní Chuilleanáin’s momentous Collected Poems, which gathers nine volumes of poetry from nearly 50 years. This poem, originally from her collection The Girl Who Married the Reindeer (2001), represents the “booming canter” of her oeuvre. “Achill Horses” by Mainie Jellett, oil on canvas, 1941   The Horses of Meaning Let their hooves print the next bit of the story: release them, r…

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Poem of the Week: “Curtain” by Eiléan Ní Chuilleanáin

In her 2010 collection, The Sun-fish, Eiléan Ní Chuilleanáin dives deep into the everyday, exploring ideas on nature, writing, folklore, religion, love, grief, and the shifting concept of home. Implementing allegory, verging at times on parable, “her poems invite being read, while seeming not to care what the reader makes of them,” writes William Logan in a review for The New Criterion. In “Curtain,” she beautifully questions the transience of li…

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Poem of the Week: “Direction” by Eiléan Ní Chuilleanáin

In this poem, Eiléan Ní Chuilleanáin reflects on the soft, rather than distinct, boundary lines which define what is past, present, and future. In “Direction,” as the narrator delves into her father’s former struggles to locate his position in the now, she points to how events that have already passed illuminate the present and provide a guiding hope for what is to come. This poem is taken from The Boys of Bluehill, published by Wake Forest Unive…

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Happy birthday to Eiléan Ní Chuilleanáin and Poem of the Week

Happy birthday to Eiléan Ní Chuilleanáin and Poem of the Week

…the birthday of one of “the very best poets of her generation,” Eiléan Ní Chuilleanáin. To celebrate, we’re offering a 10% discount on any of her books* for one week only. Enjoy the poem below or pick up a copy of your favorite volume from our website using the coupon code “BirthdayENC2014”. *excludes rare, limited edition, collectible and used copies Snow ‘I thought of you then,’ she says, ‘flocking On the edge of the same water — The yearly wal…

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Interview with Eiléan Ní Chuilleanáin

A Brief Interview with Eiléan Ní Chuilleanáin by WFU Press Student Interns November, 2009 Q. How did you find your experience on your recent American tour, and how did you like your most recent visit to Wake Forest? Did you have any time to enjoy yourself away from the readings? A. I always enjoy coming to Wake Forest and was fortunate that the weather was so fine. I was able to wander around Graylyn and the campus and admire the buildings. [I wa…

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The Sun-fish

The Sun-fish

…proaches to family and political history, thwarted pilgrimages in which Ní Chuilleanáin poses many questions—not always directly—and often chooses to leave the questions themselves unresolved, allowing them to resonate meaningfully past the actual poem’s end. She is a truly imaginative poet, whose imagination is authoritative and transformative. . . . These are potent poems, with dense, captivating sound and a certain magic that proves not only to…

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The Girl Who Married the Reindeer

The Girl Who Married the Reindeer

…of her breath is turning the locked lock green. Throughout the volume, Ní Chuilleanáin displaces the finger posts of narrative which is redefined of a traveler’s productive strayings and even self-exiles: “I follow the road that follows the lie of the land.” Praise for The Girl who Married the Reindeer “Eiléan Ní Chuilleanáin’s new collection of poems, The Girl who Married the Reindeer, brings together poems so elegant and difficult, rich and hau…

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Poem of the Week: “Rugă / Prayer” by Ileana Mălăncioiu

Chuilleanáin in her collection titled Legend of the Walled-Up Wife. As Ní Chuilleanáin writes in the preface to the book, “Mălăncioiu’s writing is valued in Romania as a moral force. A courageous critic of the former political masters of her country, she has also been forthright in her responses to the new order. To read through the poems published under Ceaușescu is to be astonished both at what she succeeded in publishing, and at her survival.”…

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The Mother House

The Mother House

…pple Books EPUB version available on Nook Praise for The Mother House: “Ní Chuilleanáin’s instinct has always been to compose poems with camera angles. … She has been a word-cinematographer, and her camerawork has always been that of a woman voyaging, capturing the light, the angles and the briefly glimpsed faces of strangers or fellow voyagers. … Yet another perfect book from this poet of sunlight and cloisters.” – Thomas McCarthy, Dublin Review…

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The Boys of Bluehill

The Boys of Bluehill

…of hiding and discovery are ours to find and unravel. Listen to Eiléan Ní Chuilleanáin read from The Boys of Bluehill, discuss the title, and explain some of her inspirations in an RTÉ radio interview. Kindle version available at Amazon.com iBook version available at iBooks Praise for The Boys of Bluehill “Ní Chuilleanáin is the Vermeer of contemporary poetry. Her luminous interiors achieve great visual beauty, but should not be mistaken for exer…

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“It felt like a breaking of some taboo I’d placed myself under”: Caitríona O’Reilly on writing Geis

…elf too seriously. But there are also brilliant women poets like Eiléan Ní Chuilleanáin and Vona Groarke who are keeping the flame of the musical lyric alive. Openness, diversity, these seem the biggest trends, with younger poets selecting affinities and interests from a wide base and being bold in their experiments, which can only be a good thing. In your Ph.D. you concentrated on Emily Dickinson, H.D., and Sylvia Plath. Were you interested in a…

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The WFU Press Holiday Sale & Gift-Giving Guide

…of our Irish poets have translated from other languages, such as Eiléan Ní Chuilleanáin’s Legend of the Walled-Up Wife, a translation of the Romanian poet Ileana Mӑlӑncioiu. Check out the “Translation” section of our online catalog. 5. For the person who has too many books: Is your friend unable to leave a bookstore without adopting something new for their bookshelf? When you try to gift them books, do they always already have them? Not to fear! T…

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Introducing: The Boys of Bluehill

Introducing: The Boys of Bluehill

…Wake Forest University Press is proud to announce the arrival of Eiléan Ní Chuilleanáin’s Boys of Bluehill. In her newest collection, Ní Chuilleanáin addresses the themes of music, religion, art, and language to create a beautiful union between revelatory imagery and an acute poetic sensibility. Of her work, Seamus Heaney remarked: “There is something second-sighted about Eiléan Ní Chulleanáin’s work. Her poems see things anew, in a rinsed and dre…

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“Legend of the Walled-up Wife” featured in The Antioch Review

“Legend of the Walled-up Wife” featured in The Antioch Review

…ughtful look at our recent volume, Legend of the Walled-up Wife, Eiléan Ní Chuilleanáin’s translations of Ileana Mălăncioiu’s poetry. Written under the Ceaușescu regime, the book has dark, chilling imagery throughout and critic Benjamin S. Grossberg writes: “Mălăncioiu often blurs the line between life and death, creating the sense of haunted dislocation one finds in Dickinson.” He adds that Ní Chuilleanáin’s translation, despite its colloquial to…

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Did You Know…

Did You Know…

…e of the poets who just joined us on our Women’s Anthology Tour, Eiléan Ní Chuilleanáin. Did you know that her great-uncle Joseph Mary Plunkett signed the 1916 Proclamation during the Easter Rising in Ireland? The Easter Rising was an attempt by Irish republicans to establish the Irish Republic during World War I when all of Ireland was still under control of the British Empire. The 1916 Proclamation was a document that declared Ireland’s independ…

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Broadside: Juliette Ryan and the Cement Mixer

Broadside: Juliette Ryan and the Cement Mixer

…8″ x 10-1/2″ Broadside of Eiléan Ní Chuilleanáin’s poem, “Juliette Ryan and the Cement Mixer,” from The Boys of Bluehill Laser-printed on quality linen paper This broadside was created on the occasion of Eiléan Ní Chuilleanáin’s Wake Forest reading on April 4, 2016. Poem used with kind permission of the author and Wake Forest University Press…

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The Wake Forest Book of Irish Women’s Poetry 1967–2000

The Wake Forest Book of Irish Women’s Poetry 1967–2000

…This groundbreaking anthology includes poetry from Eavan Boland, Eiléan Ní Chuilleanáin, Medbh McGuckian, Nuala Ní Dhomhnaill, Rita Ann Higgins, Paula Meehan, Mary O’Malley, Kerry Hardie, and Moya Cannon. The content in The Wake Forest Book of Irish Women’s Poetry 1967-2000 is selected and edited by Peggy O’Brien. Reviews “[T]his collection is one of the first proofs that Irish women poets have collectively emerged from the shadows of their brothe…

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The Magdalene Sermon and Earlier Poems

The Magdalene Sermon and Earlier Poems

…s whore, apostle, love, and priestess—be the patron saint of this book. Ní Chuilleanáin’s eccentric poems uncover hidden dramas in many guises, and she continually holds us captive by her luminous voice.” – Molly Bendall, Denver Quarterly “The Magdalene Sermon is simple, uncluttered, and limpid, and Ní Chuilleanáin’s poems are graceful and marvelously unfussy; she seems incapable of writing a superfluous line.” – Jonathan Allison, Irish Literary S…

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The Brazen Serpent

The Brazen Serpent

…legends—family stories—fragment and alter in each individual’s memory. Ní Chuilleanáin‘s language is supple and acute enough to undertake its most difficult subject, how we perceive and understand the world, and how we share our worlds in mystery and love. The Brazen Serpent marks yet another advance in the work of a major poet. Praise for The Brazen Serpent “It’s the quiet confidence of her voice, its modesty, its convinced seriousness and tough…

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Legend of the Walled-Up Wife

Legend of the Walled-Up Wife

…o make oblique statements both her art and political instrument. Eiléan Ní Chuilleanáin studied Romanian so she could movingly translate these poems and their powerful message. The use of legend, fable, and myth is richly important to both poets, resulting in a book of remarkable poetic compatibility. Praise for Legend of the Walled-Up Wife “Mălăncioiu often blurs the line between life and death, creating the sense of haunted dislocation one finds…

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The Second Voyage

The Second Voyage

Selections from Eiléan Ní Chuilleanáin‘s first two books—Acts and Monuments (1966) and Site of Ambush (1975), both published in Ireland by The Gallery Press—are included in The Second Voyage, originally published in 1977. Note: First edition. The book is officially out of print. Praise for The Second Voyage: “In line with ancient nature verse and much Irish poetry (male), Ní Chuilleanáin does not look for cosmopolitan themes, but takes particular…

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Portobello Sonnets

Portobello Sonnets

…breac “…his voice in Portobello Sonnets claims a poetic authority as willed, as unambiguous, as James Clarence Mangan’s.” –Eiléan Ní Chuilleanáin, Dublin Review of Books    …

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Pharaoh’s Daughter

Pharaoh’s Daughter

…uckian, Tom MacIntyre, Derek Mahon, John Montague, Paul Muldoon, Eiléan Ní Chuilleanáin, and George O’Brien Reviews “[T]he branching-out, or shape-shifting, from Gaelic myth or folk-song to some less romantic or quirkier emblem of the present, is a constant resource of Nuala Ní Dhomhnaill’s poetry; and it’s one of the ways she has rescued the Irish language from its association with Gaelic League pieties or the pedantries of the past.” – Times Lit…

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Medbh McGuckian

Medbh McGuckian

…” Her most recent book, Blaris Moor, was published in 2016. With Eiléan Ní Chuilleanáin, Medbh McGuckian co-translated Nuala Ní Dhomhnaill’s collection The Water Horse (2000); she is also the author of Horsepower Pass By! A Study of the Car in the Poetry of Seamus Heaney (1999) and is the editor of an anthology of younger Northern Irish poets, The Big Striped Umbrella (1985). Praise for Medbh McGuckian “Dickinsonian in her foregrounding of female…

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The Miraculous Parish/An paróiste míorúilteach

The Miraculous Parish/An paróiste míorúilteach

…n Boland, Nuala Ní Dhomhnaill, Biddy Jenkinson, Medbh McGuckian, Eiléan Ní Chuilleanáin, Rita Ann Higgins, and others, and in more daunting social circumstances, Máire Mhac an tSaoi’s poetry speaks to and from the intimate experience of women at a time when women’s voices were largely inaudible, on the margins of Irish literature and society. A Miraculous Parish is a bilingual selection of her work, the first substantial collection to introduce he…

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‘Tis the season for poetry readings

…Everyone knows that poetry is best when listened to, so kick back, relax and belatedly celebrate National Poetry Day with some readings from our poets. Ciaran Carson reading “Snow” from Belfast Confetti Eiléan Ní Chuilleanáin reads from The Sun-Fish Paula Meehan reads her poem “Death of a Field” from Painting Rain Michael Longley reads “Harmonica” from his Collected Poems Vona Groarke reads “Pier” from Spindrift…

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Poem of the Week: “Augury” by Caitríona O’Reilly

Poem of the Week: “Augury” by Caitríona O’Reilly

…opportunity to listen to O’Reilly, along with Rita Ann Higgins, Eiléan Ní Chuilleanáin, and Leontia Flynn, as the Women’s Anthology tour kicked off in Winston-Salem. This semester, Wake got lucky again: O’Reilly is teaching a course here on Creative Writing! Augury Magnetic winds from the sun pour in and send our instruments akimbo. Nothing runs like clockwork now. As skeletal clouds unwreathe our exposure, panicky citizens climb ladders to hamme…

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The Water Horse

The Water Horse

…Horse is in Irish and English; translated by Medbh McGuckian and Eiléan Ní Chuilleanáin Reviews “As is to be expected of such a thrilling collaboration between such talented individuals, the results are literary magic. Ní Dhomhnaill’s style is at once erudite and down-to-earth, cosmopolitan and parochial.” – Niall McGrath, The Black Mountain Review “Through creating this volume, these three poets have created a rich tapestry that invites a reader…

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“Mostly dark, with a chink of light”: Alan Gillis reflects on Scapegoat and Other Poems

…le that again. Arrghhhh! You’ve mentioned both Ciaran Carson and Eiléan Ní Chuilleanáin as influences. Could you discuss these poets and how their work has informed or changed your own? I love Ciaran’s writing—his absolute dedication to the imagination and to literature, where style is raised to a kind of Neo-Platonic ideal, but jokes are still allowed. I think he is one of the great writers about place. As with Joyce, Ciaran’s groundedness in, an…

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5 things we’re looking forward to in 2015

…ere (translations of poems by the French poet Jean Follain), and Eiléan Ní Chuilleanáin’s insightful volume, The Boys of Bluehill. We’re also happy to announce that our 2015 catalogue will include two poets we haven’t yet published: Frank Ormsby’s Goat’s Milk, which features both selected and new poems, and Caitríona O’Reilly’s Geis. 5. A Month of Poetry Throughout April we will be celebrating National Poetry Month. We’ve already found some fun wa…

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Máire Mhac an tSaoi

Máire Mhac an tSaoi

…heartbroken if it survived as a literary language. As long as I’m alive, Irish is alive.” Praise for Máire Mhac an tSaoi “A generation before the groundbreaking achievements of Eavan Boland, Nuala Ní Dhomhnaill, Biddy Jenkinson, Medbh McGuckian, Eiléan Ní Chuilleanáin, Rita Ann Higgins, and others, and in more daunting social circumstances, Máire Mhac an tSaoi’s poetry speaks to and from the intimate experience of women at a time when women’s voic…

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Poem of the Week: “Persephone Suffering from SAD” by Nuala Ní Dhomhnaill

Poem of the Week: “Persephone Suffering from SAD” by Nuala Ní Dhomhnaill

…Ní Dhomhnaill’s poems are in Irish, with English translations by Eiléan Ní Chuilleanáin and Medbh McGuckian. These poems present other convergences, particularly the mingling of mythology with modern life as in today’s poem, where we encounter the Persephone of Greek myth in current times. A quick note: The Irish phrase in the last line, Céad Míle Fáilte, is a common greeting meaning “a hundred thousand welcomes.” Persephone Suffering from SAD Now…

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Bone and Marrow/Cnámh agus Smior: An Anthology of Irish Poetry from Medieval to Modern

Bone and Marrow/Cnámh agus Smior: An Anthology of Irish Poetry from Medieval to Modern

…s and suggestive criticism, it is a monument, and it is alive.” —Eiléan Ní Chuilleanáin “It is impossible to do justice to the grandeur and immensity of this book… Believe me, in possessing this book you will never need another Irish anthology.” —Thomas McCarthy “A must for anyone who calls themselves Irish, or who wants to experience what being Irish means. A must anyway!” —Greg Delanty “Aistear draíochtúil le hanailís uileghabhálach trí thréimhs…

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Poetry in Pop Culture: “poems change people’s understanding of what’s going on in the world”

Poetry in Pop Culture: “poems change people’s understanding of what’s going on in the world”

…and ad campaigns is making poetry more accessible to prospective readers, I think that is one step in the right direction. So keep an ear out, because who knows when you might hear Eiléan Ní Chuilleanáin’s or Conor O’Callaghan’s words roll off your favorite star’s tongue. Just for fun: The Favorite Poets of Pop Culture Characters Posted by Nicole…

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John McAuliffe in Conversation with Conor O’Callaghan

…fway presentable poems to send there and which to Cyphers, which Eiléan Ní Chuilleanáin edited. I liked her poems and when she wrote me a useful note about the poems, that meant almost as much as getting a letter from Poetry Ireland to say “Going Places” would be published. I was doing an MA by research in the English Department at the time. There were decades of back issues of Poetry on the shelves and The Hudson Review and The Southern Review, S…

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The Shack: Irish Poets in the Foothills and Mountains of the Blue Ridge

The Shack: Irish Poets in the Foothills and Mountains of the Blue Ridge

…iversity to the world. Includes poems and prose by Paul Muldoon, Eiléan Ní Chuilleanáin, David Wheatley, John Montague and Elizabeth Wassell, Vona Groarke, Ciaran Carson, Medbh McGuckian, Conor O’Callaghan, Michael Longley, and Derek Mahon. With lush watercolors by Kenneth Frazelle and an eighteenth-century painting of Old Salem by Christian Daniel Welfare. Footage of Conor O’Callaghan reading one of his poems from the book at the launch on March…

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The Wake Forest Book of Irish Women’s Poetry

The Wake Forest Book of Irish Women’s Poetry

…t edition, features poetry by sixteen of Ireland’s finest poets: Eiléan Ní Chuilleanáin, Eavan Boland, Eva Bourke, Medbh McGuckian, Kerry Hardie, Nuala Ní Dhomhnaill, Mary O’Malley, Rita Ann Higgins, Paula Meehan, Moya Cannon, Katie Donovan, Vona Groarke, Enda Wyley, Sinéad Morrissey, Caitríona O’Reilly, and Leontia Flynn. This edition of The Wake Forest Book of Irish Women’s Poetry is edited by and includes a new preface by Peggy O’Brien. Electro…

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Arts and Culture: Alice Maher and Irish Readers

Arts and Culture: Alice Maher and Irish Readers

…he cover of The Wake Forest Book of Irish Women’s Poetry, and we particularly love this cover, partly for its own power, and partly because it recalls … to us … Eiléan Ní Chuilleanáin‘s poem, “Pygmalion’s Image,” and the line “a / green leaf of language comes twisting out of her mouth.”…

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A Spell to Bless the Silence: Selected Poems

A Spell to Bless the Silence: Selected Poems

…r Sick Call’ from the years of the re-establishment of peace.” – Eiléan Ní Chuilleanáin “A towering and charismatic presence in Irish poetry for over half a century, John Montague was one of the key voices of the post-Yeatsean era. He was our first great poet of Ulster memory, Ulster family, exile, yearning, and conflict. This shrewd and generous selection from his life’s work will give a new generation of readers a real sense of his fabulous voic…

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The Miraculous Máire Mhac an tSaoi

The Miraculous Máire Mhac an tSaoi

…or such female literary giants as Eavan Boland, Medbh McGuckian, Eiléan Ní Chuilleanáin, and Nuala Ní Dhomhnaill. The Miraculous Parish solidifies her reputation as the greatest living Irish language poet. The title refers to Mhac an tSaoi’s early childhood in the “miraculous parish” of Dún Chaoin (Dunquin), a Gaeltacht village in County Kerry, where she learned Irish. In the author’s preface, Mhac an tSaoi writes, “I remember a distinguished Celt…

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The Poetry Project

The Poetry Project

…n presidency; it’s a great way to discover new artists. (Previous installments featured poems by fellow Wake Forest poets Thomas Kinsella, Eilean Ni Chuilleanain, Vona Groarke, Nuala Ni Dhomhnaill, and many more.) Enjoy!…

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